Stories for Deborah F. Kelly

  • Scientists develop new toolkit to examine molecular mechanisms of human disease

    Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientist Deborah Kelly and her research team developed a tunable microchip to view activity inside a human breast cancer cell for the first time.
  • Scientist receives research grant to study underpinnings of hard-to-treat, hereditary breast cancer

    Deborah Kelly, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was recently awarded a $1.8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health, to develop an innovative technique to investigate what causes BRCA1 mutations.
  • Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute announces medical research scholar awards

    Six doctoral students conducting research in laboratories at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute were recently named as medical research scholars. They will each receive a fellowship to support their research for the 2014–15 academic year.
  • Researchers to study mechanisms of hard-to-solve, hereditary breast cancer to find treatment options

    Deborah Kelly and Zhi Sheng, assistant professors at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, were recently named recipients of a grant from the Commonwealth Health Research Board. This board funds research intended to benefit Virginia residents.
  • Insights into a viral nanomachine

    Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute are using new nanoscale imaging approaches to shed light on the dynamic activities of rotaviruses, important pathogens that cause life-threatening diarrhea in young children.
  • A critical component for future physicians

    An emphasis on research in the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine’s curriculum—coupled with broad opportunities for collaboration with Virginia Tech, Carilion Clinic, and the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute—sets medical students up for lifelong learning.
  • Scientists image nanoparticles in action

    Thanks to a technique developed at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, scientists can observe the actions of the smallest tools made by humans - gold nanoparticles - in a liquid environment.
  • A nanoscale window to the biological world

    Investigators at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have invented a way to directly image biological structures at their most fundamental level and in their natural habitats. The technique is a major advancement toward the ultimate goal of imaging biological processes in action at the atomic level.

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