Briefs for Gregorio Valdez

  • Gregorio Valdez develops search engine for genes

    A frontier lies deep within our cells. Our bodies are as vast as oceans and space, composed of a dizzying number of different types of cells. Exploration reaches far, yet the genes that make each cell and tissue unique have remained largely obscure.

  • Gregorio Valdez receives grant to research how to slow ALS

    An early-career researcher at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute has won his first major independent grant from the National Institutes of Health. And if his research pans out, the result could be a therapeutic technique to slow – or even stop – the onset of the most debilitating symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as ALS.

  • Gregorio Valdez highlighted in story from top ALS nonprofit biotech organization

    Gregorio Valdez, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was featured in an article about promising research that could slow the onset and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, of ALS. The article appeared on the homepage of the ALS Therapy Development Institute, the top nonprofit biotechnology organization dedicated to developing effective treatments for ALS.

  • Gregorio Valdez presents lectures at the National Institutes of Health and international conferences in Brazil

    Gregorio Valdez, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, has had a busy schedule this past month, having traveled the world to give several talks on his research regarding neuromuscular junctions.

  • Valdez collaboration to search for genetic causes of epilepsy

    Gregorio Valdez, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, has been awarded a grant in collaboration with Judy Shih-Hwa Liu of the Children’s National Medical Center to search for molecular mechanisms that could prevent the initiation or progression of epileptic seizures.

  • Gregorio Valdez presents on the effects of aging and lifestyle factors on motor synapses

    Gregorio Valdez, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, recently served on the program committee for the Gerontological Society of America’s annual meeting. The society is a multidisciplinary group of professionals that promotes the scientific study of aging. The meeting took place on November 14-18 in San Diego, California, and brought together more than 4,000 of the brightest minds in the field of aging. This year’s theme was “Charting New Frontiers in Aging.”

  • Gregorio Valdez included in most widely used neuroscience graduate textbook

    The work of Gregorio Valdez, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, on aging synapses is included in the most recent edition of Principles of Neural Science, the most widely used book to teach neuroscience to graduate students. First published in 1981 by Elsevier, Principles of Neural Science is a textbook now in its fifth edition, which was published in October 2012.