Stories for Kenneth Oestreich

  • Scientists identify potential key to therapeutic treatments for autoimmune diseases

    A collaborative team of scientists led by Kenneth Oestreich, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, has identified a novel combination of immune response factors involved in the body’s fight against invading pathogens. This new finding is poised to develop insight into the development of better vaccines or even into chronic autoimmune diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Scientists find new evidence of immune system plasticity

    Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have found a potential way to influence long-term memory formation in the immune system. The researchers published their results this week in Nature Communications.
  • Scientists find a small tweak could make a big difference in immune cells

    Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered even a small shift in environmental factors can change how a cell in the immune system matures.
  • Kenneth Oestreich recognized with international award

    Kenneth Oestreich, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was honored as this year’s Pfizer-Showell Travel Award winner for the annual meeting of the American Association of Immunologists. The prize pays for Oestreich to attend the Immunology 2015 conference, to be held in New Orleans, Louisiana in May.
  • Challenge accepted: Ice bucket edition

    One, two, three! A collective shriek signaled the successful completion of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute Ice Bucket Challenge. It was the second challenge of four, followed by students from the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, and then by the school’s deans and faculty members.
  • Cell ‘memory’ could be key to strengthen vaccine efficacy

    A team of scientists from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and the University of Alabama at Birmingham say that the immunology boot camp is more communication-intensive than initially thought — a discovery that could help efforts to produce more effective vaccines.