Stories for Michael Fox

  • Scientists: Parasite may alter signaling in the brain

    Scientists from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and the University at Buffalo found that the parasite-induced infection alters neural pathways specifically related to the neurotransmitter gamma-Aminobutyric acid, better known as GABA. The researchers recently published their results in the American Society for Microbiology’s open-access journal, [mBio](http://mbio.asm.org/content/6/6/e01428-15.figures-only).
  • ‘Brainbow’ reveals surprising data about visual connections in brain

    Neuroscientists know that some connections in the brain are pruned through neural development. Function gives rise to structure, according to the textbooks. But scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered that the textbooks might be wrong.
  • Scientists earn grant to study the leading cause of childhood blindness

    Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists were awarded a grant by the National Institutes of Health to study optic nerve hypoplasia, the leading cause of childhood blindness.
  • Scientist’s dogma-challenging work recognized with prestigious grant

    Michael Fox, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was recently named a 2015 NARSAD Independent Investigator.
  • Brain School 2015 focuses on beginnings

    As part of Brain Awareness Week, the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute will host its third annual Brain School to share neuroscientific nuggets and introduce the latest brain research.
  • Challenge accepted: Ice bucket edition

    One, two, three! A collective shriek signaled the successful completion of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute Ice Bucket Challenge. It was the second challenge of four, followed by students from the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, and then by the school’s deans and faculty members.
  • Seeing trees for the forest: Scientists find new aspects to visual system development

    It’s not the destination that matters; it’s the journey – except when it comes to the brain. Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have found that the cells reaching from the eye to the brain form their branched endings differently, depending on where in the brain their endings terminate. The result is a single cell body with several terminals that look different.
  • Scientists, including students, find new aspects to visual system development

    A recently published Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute study came with a twist not often found in scientific papers. One of the first authors, who just completed her freshman year at Virginia Tech, was a high school student when she started working on the project, while most of the other authors are undergraduate, graduate, or medical students.

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