Stories for Robert Gourdie

  • Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute announces medical research scholar awards

    Six doctoral students conducting research in laboratories at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute were recently named as medical research scholars. They will each receive a fellowship to support their research for the 2014–15 academic year.
  • First clinical trial for novel skin wound-healing compound is a success

    Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientist Robert Gourdie developed a wound-healing peptide while researching how electrical signals trigger heartbeats. He never imagined that the peptide, ACT1, would prove to heal venous leg ulcers twice as quickly as the current standard of care.
  • A time to heal, abbreviated

    Robert Gourdie, a professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, thought it might be too good to be true. The tissue samples were healing, and they were healing quickly. The compound he developed with his research team worked.
  • Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute sets a new pace in heart research

    The Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, well known for its innovative, world-class brain research, is launching a major new initiative in cardiovascular research.
  • Catalyst grant spurs advanced research into the repair and regeneration of damaged tissue

    The Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute has been named a recipient of a generous grant from the Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corporation.
  • Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute fuels the fires of rising stars

    The Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute has announced the second class of recipients of its Medical Research Scholars fellowship program. The recipients will receive $35,000 to support their research and participate in seminar series and a journal club. The awardees include Lara Moody, Aboozar Monavarfes, Jason Zhang, Katie Degan, and Michael Entz.
  • A nice dilemma to have: Two fellowships for the price of one

    Conventional wisdom states that, in general, two is better than one. But what if you’re not allowed to have both, even if you can get your hands on them? That was the dilemma that Rengasayee “Sai” Veeraraghavan, a postdoctoral associate at the Virginia Tech Carilion Resaerch Institute, recently faced when he received news that he had been awarded a fellowship from the American Heart Association. Although he was thrilled by the honor, there was just one problem; Veeraraghavan had already been awarded a fellowship from the Heart Rhythm Society, and he could not accept both.
  • Beating to a different flow

    Rengasayee “Sai” Veeraraghavan, a postdoctoral associate at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was recently awarded a Heart Rhythm Society Research Fellowship. The fellowship is given to a half-dozen emerging scientists each year chosen from an international pool of applicants. Besides the honor that comes with the recognition, the award includes $50,000 to support research in cardiac electrophysiology – the heart’s electrical network.

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